“All that glisters…” (in the gig economy)

WynLewis

 

… “is not [necessarily] gold”,

is something that employers, contractors and self-employed people will need to remember since it was decided recently that Pimlico Plumbers’ staff and Hermes’ couriers were all workers (not self-employed contractors) entitled to worker benefits.

“But what’s this all about?” you may be asking.

It’s to do with the situation when individuals who provide personal services, who have previously been excluded from employee status by being called “consultant” or “freelance”, are having their worker entitlements “upgraded” from few (or none) to better (or full) protection.

The winners are (1) oppressed individuals whose lot has been limited; and (2) HMRC, which will get more cash via PAYE.

The losers are (1) employers, for whom engaging staff will cost more; and (2) end-users, for whom services will cost more.

So if you thought Pimlico Plumbers were already expensive, don’t be surprised if they’ll be even more so in future.

Two case reported in June 2018 have again turned the spotlight on this issue:

Pimlico Plumbers’ operatives were treated as self-employed. This was because they could provide substitutes, could choose not to accept work and could offer themselves for assignments. So Pimlico was an operative’s client, not their employer.  This was even though they drove Pimlico vans, wore Pimlico clothing, were tracked, had Pimlico ID cards, were bound by post-termination restrictions, had fixed rates and were tightly controlled by HQ.  Then one operative claimed unfair dismissal, wrongful dismissal and compensation for discrimination.  The issue was this:  whether the control by Pimlico, as well as the extent to which its operatives provided personal services (as opposed independent services via the Pimlico brand) tipped the balance away from self-employed in favour of worker (but not employee) status.  The answer was:  it did.

Hermes’ courier operatives were treated similarly. An employment tribunal held that they had little autonomy, were controlled by Hermes, had an obligation to provide their services personally and couldn’t engage in a way that let them look after their own interests (Hermes’ interests came first) such as negotiating their rates.  The judgment will affect around 14,000 Hermes couriers and Hermes has decided not to appeal the decision.  So if you use couriers a lot, don’t be surprised if they get more expensive to fund Hermes’ increased worker costs.

One effect of these decisions may be that workers may eventually get holiday pay, sick pay, minimum wage, time-off and family-friendly rights, insured benefits, quasi-unfair dismissal rights and other termination (including redundancy pay) entitlements.  Many people will say:  “And why not?”.

The story continues, because (1) the 2017 Taylor Review, since subject to Government consultation, may result in a major re-think of employee, worker and self-employed status; and (2) the confusion and expense caused by worker status may increase if there is a shortage of personnel post-Brexit, where people will be more assertive about their status in a market where employers must vie more for the attentions of a smaller workforce.